Big Squishy Bed Socks

Winter is such a good time of year to put on warm clothes and snuggle up with a good book!

I was looking for a pattern for socks knit with worsted weight yarn because I wanted to make my mom some socks to wear to bed or around the house as slipper socks.  We live in an area with cold winters so we both appreciate the comfort of thick, warm socks.  There aren’t too many patterns out there for simple worsted weight socks so I thought I would put one together.

This pattern is written for the magic loop method and is easily adaptable to be made larger or smaller. These socks would be wonderful for someone who has swollen ankles as they would not dig in to the skin. The yarn I chose is very soft, inexpensive and easily washed by machine. They could also be worn over a pair of thinner socks for extra warmth. I chose a cotton/acrylic blend but they could easily be done up in a wool blend or superwash wool. I am not a fan of hand washing socks so I would not choose a regular wool or something else that would felt easily. I like to buy extra yarn so that I do not run out and I found two balls to be more than enough.

Materials: (1) ball of Bernat Denim Style yarn or any other soft worsted/aran weight yarn (196 yards).  I just barely got one pair of socks out of one ball.  If you made smaller socks, one ball would be enough, but if you wanted to make a bigger pair, get two balls just to be safe.   You’ll also need one size 7 long, flexible circular needle, and one large yarn/tapestry needle for grafting the toe and weaving in ends.

Gauge: 9 stitches/2 inches worked in stockinette in the round

Abbreviations:

  • K-Knit
  • P-Purl
  • Sl – slip
  • SSK – slip, slip, knit (slip them as to knit, slide them back to left needle and knit them together through the back loops)
  • K2tog – Knit two together
  • P2tog – purl two together

Cast on 44 stitches. The long tail method of casting on is good and stretchy for a sock opening. Pull out a loop in the middle of your stitches and join, being careful not to twist.

Knit 2×2 ribbing (K2, P2) for 2 1/2 inches or as desired. Then switch to stockinette stitch and knit for another two inches or as long as desired.

Heel Flap:
Turn your work so the inside of the sock is facing you. Work back across the stitches you just knitted:
Sl 1, p across 21 stitches. Turn.  (You may need to move a couple of stitches from the other needle so you have 22 stitches across your heel flap.)
Then: Sl 1, knit across.

Repeat these two rows a total of 10 times.

Turning the heel:
You will have just finished a knitted row. Turn the work so you will be purling (you will be looking at the inside of the sock):
P13, p2tog, p1, turn
Sl1, k5, SSK, k1, turn
Sl1, p to the gap you made in the last row, p2tog to close gap, p1, turn
Sl1, k to the gap you made in the last row, SSK, k1, turn
Continue decreasing to close the gaps made in the previous row until all stitches have been worked. You will have 14 stitches left.

Picking up for the gusset:
You will have a line of large loops made from slipping stitches on the edge of the heel flap. Pick up each of these loops, along with a couple of extra stitches near the beginning of the instep. This will help prevent a hole where the gusset joins the heel flap.
Then knit across the instep.
Then pick up the same number of stitches on the other side of the heel flap as you just picked up on the first side. Knit 7 stitches on the heel part you just turned and place a marker. This marker will be the beginning of your round.

Gusset shaping:
You should have the instep (top of foot) on one needle, and the gussets and sole on the other. The marker should be in the middle of the heel. You will start a round at this marker.
Knit one round.
On the second round, knit until 3 stitches before the end of the needle. K2tog, k1. Then knit across the instep needle. When you get to the beginning of the sole needle, k1, SSK, then knit to the end of the round.

You will then knit one round plain. Then work a decrease round, and then a knit round, and repeat until you have 22 stitches on the sole needle (44 stitches total). The foot will be the same diameter as the leg. Continue in stockinette stitch until your foot is as long as desired. I like to start the toe when the foot comes up to the base of my big toe.

Toe Decreases:
Starting at the marker, knit until 3 stitches before the instep needle. K2tog, K1.
At the beginning of the instep needle, K1, SSK, knit until 3 stitches left on instep needle, then K2tog, K1. At the beginning of the sole needle, K1, SSK, then knit to the end of the round.
Then knit the next round plain.
You will alternate a decrease round with a knit round until you have 10 stitches left on each needle – 20 stitches total.

Use the kitchener stitch to graft the toe closed. Weave in ends.

I am more than happy to answer questions or address problems or mistakes in the pattern.  Please feel free to leave a comment and I will address any issues or questions that come up.

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13 Comments

  1. Kathy

    Hi,

    Could you please tell me, when you say to “Turn your work so the inside of the sock is facing you”, do you mean to actually flip the tube inside out? I know it may seem obvious, but this is my first pair of socks.

    Thanks,

    Kathy

    • finngarianmama

      Hi Kathy,

      Thanks for your comment! I am sorry my instructions were confusing.

      Until you get to the heel flap part, you have been knitting in the round, around and around each row. When you get to the heel flap, you will actually be knitting that flat. You’ll only knit the flap, and not any of the other stitches. The other stitches will just rest on the other needle (or cable if you are using the magic loop method).

      So, you will not turn the sock inside out, rather you will just turn your work to start knitting only the flap as a flat piece.

      Once you complete your heel flap and make the turn, then you will pick up stitches on either side of the flap and continue knitting the rest of the sock in the round.

      Please let me know if this still isn’t making sense and I’ll be happy to explain it further until you understand 🙂

      Thanks again! Liz

  2. barbara nicholls

    Recommended needle size for worsted weight yarn or practice with swatches to get 9 stitches 2 inches?

    • You could try a size 7 needle, then either go up or down if you need to adjust your gauge. These socks do stretch though and you’ll want your work to be nice and dense. Good luck! Thanks, Liz.

  3. Anne Stevenson

    Hi, I am so pleased I found your pattern for bed socks. I have just finished my second pair as a gift for my friend. I knit them using Stylecraft Aran yarn – 25% premium acrylic and 25% machine washable wool and a 4.5mm circular needle. Thanks for sharing your pattern.

    • Hello Anne! I’m so glad you like the pattern. I have used Stylecraft DK to make a blanket and it was great yarn to work with. The socks sound fantastic, if you are on Ravelry, would you mind posting a photo? I’d love to see them!

  4. Barbara Mason

    How do you work the dec round on the gusset shaping

    • Hello Barbara! Thanks for your question! Here are the instructions for the gusset decrease rounds:
      You should have the instep (top of foot) on one needle, and the gussets and sole on the other. The marker should be in the middle of the heel. You will start a round at this marker.
      Knit one round.
      On the second round, knit until 3 stitches before the end of the needle. K2tog, k1. Then knit across the instep needle. When you get to the beginning of the sole needle, k1, SSK, then knit to the end of the round.
      Doing the decreases like I described above will cause them to slant in the right direction to make your gusset look tidy. Please let me know if you need more help with this!

      • Barbara Mason

        I’m on the part where it says to knit one round plain. Then works dec round and knit a round. Rep until you have 22sts on the sole needle. And also does the rep starts at k one round plain. I’m sorry but this is my first pair of socks

      • Hi Barbara, no need to apologize! As long as you have the start of the round at the middle of the heel and have placed the marker, here’s how it goes:
        Knit from the marker until you have 3 stitches left on that needle.
        Knit 2 together, then knit one. This should be the last stitch on that needle.
        Knit across the instep (the top of your foot) which is on the next needle.
        When you get that part done, you’ll want to knit 1 stitch, then slip the next 2 stitches without knitting them, then knit them through the back loop. (Or, you can go to http://www.knittinghelp.com and look for a video on the “SSK” decrease stitch because there are many ways to do that stitch.)
        Once you’ve done the SSK stitch, continue knitting until you’ve reached the marker, which is the end of the round.
        Then you will alternate your decrease round (which you just did) and your plain knitting round, until you have 22 stitches left on the needle with the marker.
        You won’t be decreasing any stitches on the top of your foot.
        I am excited that this is your first sock! Once I learned how to knit socks, I wound up with a whole basket of them since I live in a place with cold winters. Let me know how it goes, OK?

  5. http://www.knittinghelp.com would have a video on knitting 2 stitches together also if you are having trouble with that. You would just treat those 2 stitches as one stitch and knit them both, so on the following round you’ve only got 1 stitch there instead of 2. The other decrease, the SSK will lean in the other direction which just makes your gusset look tidy.

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